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npr:

Though there’s nothing wrong with stockpiling your summer berry bounty in the freezer for an almost-fresh pie in the dead of winter, everyone knows that pies are best made with the freshest fruit you can find. So, apple pie is our quintessential fall treat, rhubarb welcomes the return of spring and a blueberry pie, while best with fresh berries, transports you to a hot day in mid-July even if you use frozen berries in January.
via Kitchen Window: The Pies Of Late Summer 
Get recipes for Nothing-In-The-House Pie Crust, Peach-Pecan Pie, Fig-Pistachio Tarte Tatin and Plum And Orange Flower Custard Galette.

npr:

Though there’s nothing wrong with stockpiling your summer berry bounty in the freezer for an almost-fresh pie in the dead of winter, everyone knows that pies are best made with the freshest fruit you can find. So, apple pie is our quintessential fall treat, rhubarb welcomes the return of spring and a blueberry pie, while best with fresh berries, transports you to a hot day in mid-July even if you use frozen berries in January.

via Kitchen Window: The Pies Of Late Summer

Get recipes for Nothing-In-The-House Pie Crust, Peach-Pecan Pie, Fig-Pistachio Tarte Tatin and Plum And Orange Flower Custard Galette.

tetw:

A Tetw reading list

How to Talk About Books You Haven’t Read by Pierre Bayard - Not reading is our main way of relating to most literature, find out how to make the most of your ignorance.

Tense Present by David Foster Wallace - In one of his finest essays, DFW reviews a dictionary of English usage, thereby tackling everything from democracy and free will to racism in academia.

The Rise of the Essay by Zadie Smith - Why do novelists write essays? And what excatly is an essay these days?

Words by Tony Judt - One of the very best essayists refelcts on his relationship with words.

The Birth of ‘The New Journalism’ by Tom Wolfe - Who put the ‘I’ in journalism? Tom Wolfe seems to think it was him and his friends.

Own Your Own Words by Steven Johnson - The ubiquity of Google has made it easy to gain control of a word or phrase, what effect is this new power having?

A Linguistic Big Bang by Lawrence Osborne - “For the first time in history, scholars are witnessing the birth of a language, a complex sign system being created by deaf children in Nicaragua.”

Cyber-Neologoliferation by James Gleick - A guided tour through the strange world of the lexicographer.

The Language of the Future by Henry Hitchings - A fascinating look at how English is mutating as it becomes the world’s lingua franca.

Printed Words, Computers, and Democratic Societies by Irving Louis Horowitz - This essay from 1983 looks forward to the advent home copmuting and the “videotext revolution”.

KK

(via tetw)

discoverynews:

How Drugs Have Changed the Tour
This year’s Tour de France opens Saturday morning, the first day of a grueling 2,172-mile, three-week event that for decades has been dogged by doping scandals — most recently against seven-time Tour champ Lance Armstrong.
Despite the continuing controversies, blood tests collected over the past decade shows that the peloton is actually getting cleaner. It’s the first scientific evidence that anti-doping efforts may be paying off. The sport of cycling, though, has had a long history of doping. It’s a practice that has been a part of cycling since early 20th-century riders downed cocktails of strychnine, cocaine and caffeine to power their pedals.
But riders are pedaling slower despite lighter bikes, more aerodynamic wheels and other technological improvements. Uphill climb times have been impacted by the use of drugs in the sport. In the 1990s and early 2000s, a time when the use of EPO was likely at its peak, the winning time up Alpe d’Huez was usually less than 40 minutes. Italian Marco Pantani’s record of 37:35 still stands, even though it was set in 1997. Second is Armstrong’s 37:36 in 2004. But the winning times have slowed. In 2011, for example, the winning time of Frenchman Pierre Rolland was 41:57, a mark that would have been good for 8th place in 2004 or 40th in 2001.
keep reading
Image: Last year’s Tour de France winner, Australian Cadel Evans, 35. Credit: Getty Images

discoverynews:

How Drugs Have Changed the Tour

This year’s Tour de France opens Saturday morning, the first day of a grueling 2,172-mile, three-week event that for decades has been dogged by doping scandals — most recently against seven-time Tour champ Lance Armstrong.

Despite the continuing controversies, blood tests collected over the past decade shows that the peloton is actually getting cleaner. It’s the first scientific evidence that anti-doping efforts may be paying off. The sport of cycling, though, has had a long history of doping. It’s a practice that has been a part of cycling since early 20th-century riders downed cocktails of strychnine, cocaine and caffeine to power their pedals.

But riders are pedaling slower despite lighter bikes, more aerodynamic wheels and other technological improvements. Uphill climb times have been impacted by the use of drugs in the sport. In the 1990s and early 2000s, a time when the use of EPO was likely at its peak, the winning time up Alpe d’Huez was usually less than 40 minutes. Italian Marco Pantani’s record of 37:35 still stands, even though it was set in 1997. Second is Armstrong’s 37:36 in 2004. But the winning times have slowed. In 2011, for example, the winning time of Frenchman Pierre Rolland was 41:57, a mark that would have been good for 8th place in 2004 or 40th in 2001.

keep reading

Image: Last year’s Tour de France winner, Australian Cadel Evans, 35. Credit: Getty Images